Greek

Greek
Mythology

Greek mythology is a beautiful fairy tale based on fantastic stories or a reality where the mythical heroes were historical figures?

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Greek mythology gives us an insight into how people thought and worshiped thousands of years ago. Myths lead us back in time when man has a connection with the earth and nature. Through mythology we travel to a strange and beautiful world.

What are Myths and Mythology

The term Greek mythology covers all the myths that are related to the Greek tradition, as they are presented in the texts of the ancient Greek writers. Greek mythology specifically defines the narrative of the mythical history created by the ancient Greeks and related to their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the ritual practices of their worship.

Greek mythology consists of a rich collection of narratives that refer to the origins of the world and describe the life and adventures of a wide variety of gods, heroes and other mythological creatures. These stories were originally formed through the oral and poetic tradition before they were written in the works of Greek literature.

The oldest known literary sources are the two epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer (8th century BC), dedicated to the events of the Trojan War and to the Odysseus adventures that followed. The poetic works of Hesiod (8th century BC), Theogony and Works and Days are a major source of Greek mythology. Several myths have also been preserved by Homeric hymns, segments of epic cycle poems, lyrical poems, works of tragedies of the 5th century BC, writings of scholars and poets of the Hellenistic period, and texts written by writers of Roman times such as Plutarch and of Pausanias.

Greek mythology has an essential influence on Western civilization in general, its philosophy, its history, its politics, its arts and literature, and is considered to be a key element of Western heritage. It is part of education, from a young age, in many western countries. Poets, intellectuals, and artists have drawn inspiration from Greek mythology.

 

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Olympian Gods​

Zeus - ο Δίας - Jupiter

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Zeus - ο Δίας - Jupiter

The father of Gods and the most important of them. God of the weather phenomena, protector of foreigners, family and fertility. He was worshiped as the wise god who defined the fortunes of the people and regulated the moral order of the world. He was also a brother of the goddess Hestia, goddess Demeter, god Poseidon and god Pluto.

Aphrodite - Αφροδίτη - Venus

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Aphrodite - Αφροδίτη - Venus

Goddess of beauty and love. She was the most beautiful woman of all gods and people. She was born of the sea foam, when Chronos cut the genitals of his father, Uranus, and threw them into the sea. All the gods admired her and wanted her for their wife. the other gods feared that Aphrodite's beauty might lead to conflict and war, through rivalry for her favours.

Hephaestus - Ήφαιστος - Vulcan

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Hephaestus - Ήφαιστος - Vulcan

Hephaestus, is the Greek god of blacksmiths, metalworking, carpenters, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metallurgy, fire, and volcanoes. As a smithing god, Hephaestus made all the weapons of the gods in Olympus. He served as the blacksmith of the gods, and was worshipped in the manufacturing and industrial centers of Greece, particularly Athens.

Athena - Αθήνα - Minerva

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Athena - Αθήνα - Minerva

Goddess of wisdom, war and the crafts, and favourite daughter of Zeus, Athena was, perhaps, the wisest, most courageous, and certainly the most resourceful of the Olympian gods.Athena was portrayed as having a calm temperament, and moving slowly to anger. She was believed to only fight for just causes and never fight without a purpose. She is closely associated with Athens, the city named in her honour after the people of Attica chose her as their patron following her gift of the olive tree, symbol of peace and plenty.

Apollon - Απόλλων

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Apollon - Απόλλων

Apollon is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis.

Ares - Άρης - Mars

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Ares - Άρης - Mars

God of battle and war. He was the son of god Zeus and goddess Hera, and therefore a brother of the god Hephaestus, goddess Hebe and goddess Eileithyia. The god Aris represented the bloodshed, violence, and the impulsivity of the war, while the goddess Athena represented the strategy in the war.

Artemis - Άρτεμις -Diana

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Artemis - Άρτεμις -Diana

Goddess of wildlife, hunting, animals and fertility. Daughter of Zeus and goddess Leto, twin sister of god Apollo. She was born first and even helped her mother to give birth to her brother. And that's why, from then on, she was also the goddess of births. She took part in the Trojan War but was humiliated and herded by the goddess Hera who dared to provoke her, thus showing Homer the power and superiority of Hera compared to Artemis.

Demeter - Δημήτηρ - Ceres

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Demeter - Δημήτηρ - Ceres

Demeter is the goddess of the harvest and agriculture, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth. She presided also over the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that predated the Olympian pantheon.

Hera - Ήρα - Juno

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Hera - Ήρα - Juno

Sister and wife of god Zeus. She was a protector of marriage and marital loyalty. Queen of gods and people. It was the third child of Saturn and Rhea as their last daughter. No god dared to contradict her.

Hermes - Ερμής - Mercury

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Hermes - Ερμής - Mercury

He was the messenger of the gods, a preacher and a psychologist, patron of commerce and travelersm the patron of herdsmen, thieves, graves, and heralds. He is described as moving freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, and was the conductor of souls into the afterlife. In some myths, he is a trickster and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or for the sake of humankind.

Hestia - Εστιά - Vesta

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Hestia - Εστιά - Vesta

The goddess Hestia was the eldest daughter and the first child of Chronos and Rhea, so she became the head of all the great Goddesses and protector of family happiness. All the gods respected her, and it is said that this was the connecting link that united all the gods. The goddess Hestia, the goddess Athena and the goddess Artemis, were the only Gods on whom the goddess Aphrodite had no power over them.

Poseidon - Ποσειδώνας - Neptune

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Poseidon - Ποσειδώνας - Neptune

God of the sea, rivers, springs, drinking water and generally the liquid element. He was the husband of Amphitrite. He, like his brother Zeus, had many extramarital relationships and therefore many children.

Other Gods and Titans

Achelous - Αχελώος

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Achelous - Αχελώος

Achelous was originally the god of all water and the rivers of the world were viewed by many as his sinews. As the deity of the largest river in Greece, he was considered the chief of the Greek Potamoi and father of Sirens. He is the son of Oceanus and Tethys.

Aether - Αιθήρ

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Aether - Αιθήρ

Aether was one of the primordial deities. Aether is the personification of the upper air. He embodies the pure upper air that the gods breathe, as opposed to the normal air (ἀήρ, aer) breathed by mortals. Like Tartarus and Erebus, Aether may have had shrines in ancient Greece, but he had no temples and is unlikely to have had a cult.

Andromeda - Ανδρομέδα

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Andromeda - Ανδρομέδα

Andromeda is the daughter of the Aethiopian king Cepheus and his wife Cassiopeia. When Cassiopeia's hubris leads her to boast that Andromeda is more beautiful than the Nereids, Poseidon sends the sea monster Cetus to ravage Aethiopia as divine punishment. Andromeda is stripped and chained naked to a rock as a sacrifice to sate the monster, but is saved from death by Perseus.

Anteros - Αντέρως

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Anteros - Αντέρως

Anteros was the god of requited love and also the punisher of those who scorn love and the advances of others, or the avenger of unrequited love. Anteros was the son of Ares and Aphrodite in Greek mythology, given as a playmate to his brother Eros, who was lonely – the rationale being that love must be answered if it is to prosper. Physically, he is depicted as similar to Eros in every way, but with long hair and plumed butterfly wings. He has been described also as armed with either a golden club or arrows of lead.

Aristaeus - Αρισταίος

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Aristaeus - Αρισταίος

Aristaeus was the culture hero credited with the discovery of many useful arts, including bee-keeping. He was the son of the huntress Cyrene and Apollo. Aristeus ("the best") was a cult title in many places: Boeotia, Arcadia, Ceos, Sicily, Sardinia, Thessaly, and Macedonia.

Eos - Aurora - Έως

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Eos - Aurora - Έως

Eos is a Titaness and the goddess of the dawn, who rose each morning from her home at the edge of the Oceanus. Eos had a brother and a sister, Helios, god of the sun, and Selene, goddess of the moon. Eos is the daughter of Hyperion and Theia and sister of Helios the sun and Selene the moon. The dawn goddess Eos was almost always described with rosy fingers as she opened the gates of heaven for the Sun to rise.

Boreas - Aquilo - Μπορέας

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Boreas - Aquilo - Μπορέας

Boreas was the Greek god of the cold north wind and the bringer of winter. Boreas is depicted as being very strong, with a violent temper to match. He was frequently shown as a winged old man with shaggy hair and beard, holding a conch shell and wearing a billowing cloak. Boreas' two sons Calaïs and Zetes, known as Boreads, were in the crew of the Argo as Argonauts.

Selene - Σελήνη - Luna

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Selene - Σελήνη - Luna

Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia, and sister of the sun-god Helios, and Eos, goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens. Several lovers are attributed to her in various myths, including Zeus, Pan, and the mortal Endymion. In classical times, Selene was often identified with Artemis, much as her brother, Helios, was identified with Apollo.

Heracles - Ηρακλής - Hercules

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Heracles - Ηρακλής - Hercules

Aristaeus was the culture hero credited with the discovery of many useful arts, including bee-keeping. He was the son of the huntress Cyrene and Apollo. Aristeus ("the best") was a cult title in many places: Boeotia, Arcadia, Ceos, Sicily, Sardinia, Thessaly, and Macedonia.

Charites - Gratiae

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Charites - Gratiae

In Greek mythology, a Charis or Grace is one of three or more minor goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility, together known as the or Graces. The usual list, from youngest to oldest is Aglaea, Euphrosyne, and Thalia. In Roman mythology they were known as the Gratiae, the "Graces". In some variants, Charis was one of the Graces and was not the singular form of their name. The Charites were usually considered the daughters of Zeus and Eurynome.

Hylas - Ὕλας

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Hylas - Ὕλας

Hylas was a youth who served as Heracles' companion and servant. His abduction by water nymphs was a theme of ancient art, and has been an enduring subject for Western art in the classical tradition. Hylas was the son of King Theiodamas of the Dryopians. Heracles took Hylas with him on the Argo, making him one of the Argonauts.

Asclepius - Veiovis - Ασκληπιός

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Asclepius - Veiovis - Ασκληπιός

Asclepius was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia ("Hygiene", the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso (the goddess of the healing process), Aglæa/Ægle (the goddess of beauty, splendor, glory, magnificence, and adornment), and Panacea (the goddess of universal remedy.

Nike - Νίκη - Victoria

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Nike - Νίκη - Victoria

Nike was a goddess who personified victory. Her Roman equivalent was Victoria. She was variously described as the daughter of the Titan Pallas and the goddess Styx, and the sister of Kratos (Strength), Bia (Force), and Zelus (Zeal). Nike and her siblings were close companions of Zeus, the dominant deity of the Greek pantheon. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek coins.

Okeanos - Ὠκεανός - Oceanus

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Okeanos - Ὠκεανός - Oceanus

Oceanus, a Greek water god usually said to be a Titan, one of the sons of Uranus and Gaia. According to Homer, Oceanus was the ocean-stream at the margin of the habitable world, the father of everything, limiting it from the underworld and flowing around the Elysium. Hence Odysseus has to traverse it in order to arrive in the realm of the dead.

Themis - Justitia

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Themis - Justitia

Themis is an ancient Greek Titaness. She is described as "[the Lady] of good counsel", and is the personification of divine order, fairness, law, natural law, and custom. Her symbols are the Scales of Justice, tools used to remain balanced and pragmatic. Themis means "divine law" rather than human ordinance. To the ancient Greeks she was originally the organizer of the "communal affairs of humans, particularly assemblies.

Kryseis - Χρυσηΐς - Chryseis

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Kryseis - Χρυσηΐς - Chryseis

Chryseis was a Trojan woman, the daughter of Chryses. Chryseis, her apparent name in the Iliad, means simply "Chryses' daughter"; later writers give her real name as Astynome. A later Greek legend, preserved in Hyginus' Fabulae, states that she had a son by Agamemnon. In medieval literature, Chryseis is developed into the character Cressida.

Adrestia - Nemesis - Invidia

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Adrestia - Nemesis - Invidia

Adrestia in Greek mythology 'she who cannot be escaped' was the daughter of Ares and Aphrodite and known to accompany her father Ares to war. She was venerated as a goddess of revolt, just retribution and sublime balance between good and evil. She was also believed to be another war figure, similar to her brothers Phobos and Deimos.

Adonis -Άδωνις

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Adonis -Άδωνις

Adonis is a divine figure in Greek mythology. He is portrayed as a beautiful youth and his cult was associated with fertility. Modern scholarship sometimes describes him as an annually renewed, ever-youthful vegetation god, a life-death-rebirth deity whose nature is tied to the calendar. His name is often applied in modern times to handsome youths, of whom he is the archetype.

Agathodaemon -ἀγαθοδαίμων - Agatha

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Agathodaemon -ἀγαθοδαίμων - Agatha

Agathodaemon was a spirit (daemon) of the vineyards and grainfields in ancient Greek religion. They were personal companion spirits, who ensured good luck, health, and wisdom.

Amphitrite - Αμφιτρύτη

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Amphitrite - Αμφιτρύτη

Amphitrite was a sea goddess and wife of Poseidon and the queen of the sea. Under the influence of the Olympian pantheon, she became merely the consort of Poseidon and was further diminished by poets to a symbolic representation of the sea. Amphitrite was a daughter of Nereus and Doris (and thus a Nereid). Others called her the personification of the sea itself (saltwater). Poseidon and Amphitrite had a son, Triton who was a merman, and a daughter, Rhodos and Benthesikyme.

Atropos - Ατρωπός - Morta

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Atropos - Ατρωπός - Morta

Atropos was one of the three Moirai, goddesses of fate and destiny. Atropos was the oldest of the Three Fates, and was known as the "inflexible" or "inevitable." It was Atropos who chose the mechanism of death and ended the life of mortals by cutting their thread with her "abhorred shears." She worked along with her two sisters, Clotho, who spun the thread, and Lachesis, who measured the length. Atropos has been featured in several stories such as Atalanta and Achilles.

Attis - Ἄττης

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Attis - Ἄττης

Attis was the consort of Cybele in Phrygian and Greek mythology. His priests were eunuchs, the Galli, as explained by origin myths pertaining to Attis and castration. Attis was also a Phrygian god of vegetation, and in his self-mutilation, death, and resurrection he represents the fruits of the earth, which die in winter only to rise again in the spring. The most important representation of Attis is the life size statue discovered at Ostia.

Aura - Αύρα

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Aura - Αύρα

Aura, in ancient Greek and ancient Roman religion, is the divine personification of the breeze. The plural form, Aurae, "Breezes," is often found. They are the daughters of the Anemoi. The most well-known Aurae is Chione; a daughter of Boreas (the North Wind); Chione is also a goddess of Winter and snow. Aurae are also said to partially resemble ghosts, and can become part of the breeze, or can prevent it. They appear to disappear into the air, which, along with the fact that they glide, is why they are often mistaken for spirits of the departed.

Calypso - Καλυψώ

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Calypso - Καλυψώ

Calypso was a nymph in Greek mythology, who lived on the island of Ogygia, where she detained Odysseus for seven years. Calypso is generally said to be the daughter of the Titan Atlas and Pleione. Calypso is remembered the most for her role in Homer's Odyssey, in which she attempts to keep the fabled Greek hero Odysseus on her island to make him her immortal husband. According to Homer, Calypso kept Odysseus prisoner at Ogygia for seven years, while Apollodorus says five years and Hyginus says one.

Hades - Αδης - Pluto

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Hades - Αδης - Pluto

Hades was the ancient Greek chthonic god of the underworld, which eventually took his name. Hades was regarded as the oldest son of Cronus and Rhea, although the last son regurgitated by his father. He and his brothers Zeus and Poseidon defeated their father's generation of gods, the Titans, and claimed rulership over the cosmos. Hades received the underworld, Zeus the sky, and Poseidon the sea.

Typhon - Τυφῶν - Typhoeus

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Typhon - Τυφῶν - Typhoeus

Typhon was a monstrous snaky giant and the most deadly creature in Greek mythology. Typhon was the son of Gaia and Tartarus. Typhon attempted to overthrow Zeus for the supremacy of the cosmos.

Elpis - Ελπίς - Spes

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Elpis - Ελπίς - Spes

In Greek mythology, Elpis is the personification and spirit of hope,a child of Nyx and mother of Pheme, the goddess of fame, renown and rumor. She was depicted as a young woman, usually carrying flowers or cornucopia in her hands.

Hades - Αδης - Pluto

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Hades - Αδης - Pluto

Eros was the Greek god of sexual attraction. His Roman counterpart was Cupid. Some myths make him a primordial god, while in other myths, he is the son of Aphrodite. He was one of the winged love gods, Erotes.

Hecate - Trivia - Ἑκάτη

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Hecate - Trivia - Ἑκάτη

Hecate is a goddess in Ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding two torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.

Hera - Ἥρᾱ - Juno

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Hera - Ἥρᾱ - Juno

Hera is the goddess of women and marriage in Greek mythology and religion. She is the daughter of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. Hera is married to her brother Zeus and is titled as the Queen of Heaven. One of her characteristics is her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus's other lovers and offspring and against the mortals who cross her.

Hermaphroditus - Ἑρμαφρόδιτος

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Hermaphroditus - Ἑρμαφρόδιτος

Hermaphroditus was the son of Aphrodite and Hermes. He was born a remarkably handsome boy with whom the water nymph Salmacis fell in love and prayed to be united forever. A god, in answer to her prayer, merged their two forms into one and transformed them into an androgynous form. His name is compounded of his parents' names, Hermes and Aphrodite.

Hermes - Ἑρμῆς- Mercury

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Hermes - Ἑρμῆς- Mercury

Hermes is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, the son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia, and the second youngest of the Olympian gods. Hermes was the emissary and messenger of the gods, the patron of herdsmen, thieves, graves, and heralds. He is described as moving freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, and was the conductor of souls into the afterlife.

Horae - Ὧραι

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Horae - Ὧραι

Horae were the goddesses of the seasons and the natural portions of time. They were originally the personifications of nature in its different seasonal aspects, but in later times they were regarded as goddesses of order in general and natural justice. They come and go in accordance with the firm law of the periodicities of nature and of life. Hora means 'the correct moment. They guarded the gates of Olympus, promoted the fertility of the earth, and rallied the stars and constellations.

Hygieia - Ὑγιεία - Salus

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Hygieia - Ὑγιεία - Salus

Hygieia was one of the Aeclepiadae; the sons and daughters of the god of medicine, Asclepius, and the goddess of healing, Epione. She was the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness and hygiene.

Iaso - Ἰασώ

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Iaso - Ἰασώ

Laso was the Greek goddess of recuperation from illness. The daughter of Asclepius, she had five sisters: Aceso, Aglæa/Ægle, Hygieia, Panacea, and Meditrina (Roman). All six were associated with some aspect of health or healing.

Nymphs - νύμφη

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Nymphs - νύμφη

Nymph is a minor female nature deity typically associated with a particular location or landform. Different from other goddesses, nymphs are generally regarded as divine spirits who animate nature, and are usually depicted as beautiful, young nubile maidens who love to dance and sing. They are beloved by many and dwell in mountainous regions and forests by lakes and streams.

Nyx - Νύξ - Nox

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Nyx - Νύξ - Nox

Nyx is the Greek goddess (or personification) of the night. Nyx is born of Chaos. Nyx gives birth to Aether (Brightness) and Hemera (Day). Later, on her own, Nyx gives birth to Moros (Doom, Destiny), Ker (Destruction, Death), Thanatos (Death), Hypnos (Sleep), the Oneiroi (Dreams), Momus (Blame), Oizys (Pain, Distress), the Hesperides, the Moirai (Fates), the Keres, Nemesis (Indignation), Apate (Deceit), Philotes (Friendship), Geras (Old Age), and Eris (Strife).

Pan - Πάν - Faunus

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Pan - Πάν - Faunus

Pan is the god of the wild, shepherds and flocks, nature of mountain wilds and rustic music, and companion of the nymphs. He has the hindquarters, legs, and horns of a goat, in the same manner as a faun or satyr. He is also recognized as the god of fields, groves, and wooded glens; because of this, Pan is connected to fertility and the season of spring. The ancient Greeks also considered Pan to be the god of theatrical criticism and impromptus.

Pandora - Πανδώρα

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Pandora - Πανδώρα

Pandora was the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus. According to the myth, Pandora opened a jar (pithos), in modern accounts sometimes mistranslated as "Pandora's box" releasing all the evils of humanity—although the particular evils, aside from plagues and diseases, are not specified in detail.

Persephone - Περσεφόνη - Proserpina

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Persephone - Περσεφόνη - Proserpina

Persephone is the daughter of Zeus and the harvest goddess Demeter and is the queen of the underworld. Homer describes her as the formidable, venerable majestic princess of the underworld, who carries into effect the curses of men upon the souls of the dead. Persephone was married to Hades, the god-king of the underworld. Persephone as a vegetation goddess.

Phylakopi - Φυλακωπή

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Phylakopi - Φυλακωπή

Phylakopi, located at the northern coast of the island of Milos, is one of the most important Bronze Age settlements in the Aegean and in the Cyclades. The importance of Phylakopi is in its continuity throughout the Bronze Age (i.e. from the half of the 3rd millennium BC until the 12th century BC) and because of this, it is the type-site for the investigation of several chronological periods of the Aegean Bronze Age.

Polyhymnia - Πολυύμνια

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Polyhymnia - Πολυύμνια

Polyhymnia was in Greek mythology the Muse of sacred poetry, sacred hymn, dance, and eloquence as well as agriculture and pantomime. Her name comes from the Greek words "poly" meaning "many" and "hymnos", which means "praise". She is depicted as very serious, pensive and meditative, and often holding a finger to her mouth, dressed in a long cloak and veil and resting her elbow on a pillar. Polyhymnia is also sometimes credited as being the Muse of geometry and meditation.

Tyche - Τύχη - Fortuna

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Tyche - Τύχη - Fortuna

Tyche was the presiding tutelary deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is the daughter of Aphrodite and Zeus or Hermes. She might be given various genealogies, as a daughter of Hermes and Aphrodite, or considered as one of the Oceanids, daughters of Oceanus and Tethys, or of Zeus.

Sophia - σοφία

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Sophia - σοφία

Sophia is a goddess of wisdom by Gnostics, as well as by some Neopagan, New Age, and Goddess spirituality groups. In Orthodox and Roman Catholic Christianity, Sophia, or rather Hagia Sophia (Holy Wisdom), is an expression of understanding for the second person of the Holy Trinity.

Thalia - Θαλία

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Thalia - Θαλία

Thalia in ancient Greek religion, was one of the three Graces or Charites with her sisters Aglaea and Euphrosyne. They were usually found dancing in a circle. They were the daughters of Zeus and either the Oceanid Eurynome or Eunomia, goddess of good order and lawful conduct. Thalia was the goddess of festivity and rich banquets. The Greek word thalia is an adjective applied to banquets, meaning rich, plentiful, luxuriant and abundant.

Thetis - Θέτις

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Thetis - Θέτις

Thetis is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the 50 Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. Thetis was the daughter of Nereus and Doris and a granddaughter of Tethys with whom she sometimes shares characteristics. In the Trojan War cycle of myth, the wedding of Thetis and the Greek hero Peleus is one of the precipitating events in the war which also led to the birth of their child Achilles.

Snake Goddess

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Snake Goddess

Snake Goddess is the name commonly given to a type of figurine depicting a woman holding a snake in each hand, as were found in Minoan archaeological sites in Crete. Part of the attraction of the figurines is that they can be interpreted as embodying many of the perceived, and admired, characteristics of the Minoans: their elegant, fashionable costumes.

Leto - Λητώ - Latona

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Leto - Λητώ - Latona

Snake Goddess is the name commonly given to a type of figurine depicting a woman holding a snake in each hand, as were found in Minoan archaeological sites in Crete. Part of the attraction of the figurines is that they can be interpreted as embodying many of the perceived, and admired, characteristics of the Minoans: their elegant, fashionable costumes.

Moirae - Μοῖραι - Fatae

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Moirae - Μοῖραι - Fatae

Snake Goddess is the name commonly given to a type of figurine depicting a woman holding a snake in each hand, as were found in Minoan archaeological sites in Crete. Part of the attraction of the figurines is that they can be interpreted as embodying many of the perceived, and admired, characteristics of the Minoans: their elegant, fashionable costumes.

Chloris - Χλωρίς - Flora

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Chloris - Χλωρίς - Flora

Chloris was a Nymph who was associated with spring, flowers and new growth, believed to have dwelt in the Elysian Fields. Myths had it that she was abducted by (and later married) Zephyrus, the god of the west wind (which, as Ovid himself points out, was a parallel to the story of his brother Boreas and Oreithyia) after they were married Zephyrus transformed her into a deity known as Flora. Chloris is the daughter of a different Amphion by "Persephone, daughter of Minyas". Chloris was said to have married Neleus and become queen in Pylos.

Chronos - Κρόνος - Saturn

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Chronos - Κρόνος - Saturn

Chronos is the personification of Time. Chronos is usually portrayed as an old, wise man with a long, grey beard, similar to Father Time.

Clotho - Κλωθώ - Nona

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Clotho - Κλωθώ - Nona

Clotho is one of the Three Fates or Moirai who spin (Clotho), draw out (Lachesis) and cut (Atropos) the thread of Life in ancient Greek mythology. Clotho was responsible for spinning the thread of human life. She also made major decisions, such as when a person was born, thus in effect controlling people's lives. Clotho, along with her sisters and Hermes, was given credit for creating the alphabet for their people.

Dionysos - Διόνυσος -Bacchus

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Dionysos - Διόνυσος -Bacchus

Dionysos is the god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness, fertility, theatre and religious ecstasy in ancient Greek religion and myth. Wine played an important role in Greek culture, and the cult of Dionysus was the main religious focus for its unrestrained consumption. He is presented as a son of Zeus and the mortal Semele, thus semi-divine or heroic: and as son of Zeus and Persephone or Demeter, thus both fully divine, part-chthonic and possibly identical with Iacchus of the Eleusinian Mysteries.

Erinyes - Ἐρῑνύες -Furies

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Erinyes - Ἐρῑνύες -Furies

Erinyes also known as the Furies, were female chthonic deities of vengeance; they were sometimes referred to as "infernal goddesses". The Erinyes live in Erebus and are more ancient deities than any of the Olympians. Their task is to hear complaints brought by mortals against the insolence of the young to the aged, of children to parents, of hosts to guests, and of householders or city councils to suppliants - and to punish such crimes by hounding culprits relentlessly.

Hecate - Ἑκάτη - Trivia

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Hecate - Ἑκάτη - Trivia

Hecate is a goddess in Ancient Greek religion and mythology, most often shown holding two torches or a key and in later periods depicted in triple form. She was variously associated with crossroads, entrance-ways, light, magic, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, ghosts, necromancy, and sorcery.

Helios - Ἥλιος - Sol

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Helios - Ἥλιος - Sol

Helios was the personification of the Sun in Greek mythology. He is the son of the Titan Hyperion and the Titaness Theia also known as Euryphaessa and brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn. Helios was described as a handsome titan crowned with the shining aureole of the Sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night.

Hesperos - Ἓσπερος - Vesper

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Hesperos - Ἓσπερος - Vesper

Hesperos is the Evening Star, the planet Venus in the evening. He is the son of the dawn goddess Eos (Roman Aurora) and is the half-brother of her other son, Phosphorus (also called Eosphorus; the "Morning Star"). Hesperus' Roman equivalent is Vesper. Hesperus' father was Cephalus, a mortal, while Phosphorus' was the star god Astraios.

Hypnos - Ὕπνος - Somnus

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Hypnos - Ὕπνος - Somnus

In Greek mythology, Hypnos is the personification of sleep; the Roman equivalent is known as Somnus. Hypnos is the son of Nyx ("The Night") and Erebus ("The Darkness"). His brother is Thanatos ("Death"). Both siblings live in the underworld (Hades) or in Erebus, another valley of the Greek underworld. According to rumors, Hypnos lives in a big cave, which the river Lethe ("Forgetfulness") comes from and where night and day meet.

Odysseus - Ὀδυσσεύς - Ulysses

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Odysseus - Ὀδυσσεύς - Ulysses

Odysseus, was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and the hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same epic cycle. Husband of Penelope, father of Telemachus, and son of Laërtes and Anticlea, Odysseus is renowned for his intellectual brilliance, guile, and versatility and is hence known by the epithet Odysseus the Cunning. He is most famous for his “homecoming”, which took him ten eventful years after the decade-long Trojan War.

Satyros - σάτυρος - Faun

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Satyros - σάτυρος - Faun

Satyros is one of a troop of ithyphallic male companions of Dionysus with goat-like features and often permanent erection. Early artistic representations sometimes include horse-like legs, but in 6th-century BC black-figure pottery human legs are the most common.

Zephyrus - Ζέφυρος - Favonius

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Zephyrus - Ζέφυρος - Favonius

Zephyrus, is the Greek god of the west wind. The gentlest of the winds, Zephyrus is known as the fructifying wind, the messenger of spring. It was thought that Zephyrus lived in a cave in Thrace. He was said to be the husband of Iris, goddess of the rainbow. He abducted the goddess Chloris, and gave her the domain of flowers. With Chloris, he fathered Karpos ("Fruit"). He is said to have vied for Chloris's love with his brother Boreas, eventually winning her devotion. Zephyrus was said to be the father of Balius and Xanthus, Achilles' horses.

Asteria - Ἀστερία

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Asteria - Ἀστερία

Asteria is the Titaness goddess of oracles, prophetic dreams, astrology and necromanc. She was the daughter of Koios and Phoebe, and the sister of Leto. Asteria flung herself into the Aegean Sea in the form of a quail in order to escape the advances of Zeus. She became the "quail island" of Ortygia.

Atlas - Ἄτλας

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Atlas - Ἄτλας

Atlas was a Titan condemned to hold up the sky for eternity after the Titanomachy. Although associated with various places, he became commonly identified with the Atlas Mountains in northwest Africa. Atlas was the son of the Titan Iapetus and the Oceanid Asia or Clymene. He had many children, mostly daughters, the Hesperides, the Hyades, the Pleiades, and the nymph Calypso who lived on the island Ogygia.

Mnemosyne - Μνημοσύνη

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Mnemosyne - Μνημοσύνη

Mnemosyne which is from the same source as the word mnemonic, was the personification of memory in Greek mythology. She is sometimes seen as the goddess of words and language as she invented them. Mnemosyne was the mother of the nine Muses.

Phoebe - Φοίβη

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Phoebe - Φοίβη

In ancient Greek religion, Phoebe, associated with Phoebos or "shining", was one of the original Titans, who were one set of sons and daughters of Uranus and Gaia. She was traditionally associated with the moon (see Selene). Her consort was her brother Coeus, with whom she had two daughters, Leto, who bore Apollo and Artemis, and Asteria, a star-goddess who bore an only daughter Hecate. Phoebe was perhaps seen as the Titan goddess of prophecy and oracular intellect. Phoebe was the grandmother of Apollo and Artemis.

Rhea - Ῥέα

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Rhea - Ῥέα

Asteria is the Titaness goddess of oracles, prophetic dreams, astrology and necromanc. She was the daughter of Koios and Phoebe, and the sister of Leto. Asteria flung herself into the Aegean Sea in the form of a quail in order to escape the advances of Zeus. She became the "quail island" of Ortygia.

Tethys - Τηθύς

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Tethys - Τηθύς

Asteria is the Titaness goddess of oracles, prophetic dreams, astrology and necromanc. She was the daughter of Koios and Phoebe, and the sister of Leto. Asteria flung herself into the Aegean Sea in the form of a quail in order to escape the advances of Zeus. She became the "quail island" of Ortygia.

Theia - Θεία

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Theia - Θεία

Theia also called Euryphaessa "wide-shining", is a Titaness. Her brother / consort is Hyperion, a Titan and god of the sun, and together they are the parents of Helios (the Sun), Selene (the Moon), and Eos (the Dawn). The name Theia alone means simply "goddess" or "divine. She was the eldest daughter of Gaia (Earth) and Uranus (Sky).

Themis - Θέμις

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Themis - Θέμις

Themis is an ancient Greek Titaness. She is described as "[the Lady] of good counsel", and is the personification of divine order, fairness, law, natural law, and custom. Her symbols are the Scales of Justice, tools used to remain balanced and pragmatic. Themis means "divine law" rather than human ordinance, literally "that which is put in place. To the ancient Greeks she was originally the organizer of the "communal affairs of humans, particularly assemblies".

Ancient Sites in Halkidiki

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